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MNTWS Plenary Session - Shared screen with speaker view - Recording 1/2
Martha Minchak (she/her/hers/birdbrain)
01:02:17
:) Thanks!
Thomson Soule
01:38:19
JP on nutrient poor sites is not unique to the UP. Why weren't Kirtlands in other States with these habitats and fire history?
Mark C Hove
01:42:29
Thanks for your question, Thomson.
Mark C Hove
01:42:32
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Deahn Donner
02:08:40
Hi Thomson -- that is the question! With an increasing population we are starting to see Kirtland's Warbler expand into UP, Ontario, and Wisconsin and the numbers growing instead of a few here and there. If the population continues might we see them expand into MN. It isn't any one answer, but small population, energetics to get there with lower possibility of finding a mate, and understory condition of jack pine (not all created equal)...they like the poorest of the poor with slow growing jack pine and well developed blueberry. there is also thinking that they just don't like the cold, so they will remain on the southern edge of jack pine range. ,
Mark C Hove
02:13:28
Thank you for your response, Deahn
Mark C Hove
02:17:44
If you have a question, please type it in the Chat scroll, or, at the end of the presentation, use the raised hand symbol and share your question in the order at the top of the screen.
Kim Shelton
02:28:34
Thankyou!!!
Brian Hiller
02:28:37
I'm curious if you could address your concept of a return or co-managerial approach to National Parks in the future?
Kim Shelton
02:37:46
What do you think the role of language has as we move forward in our relationship with the natural world? I'm thinking of how the language we speak shapes our thoughts/relationships, history of english language in setllement etc...
Michelle Doerr
02:42:35
Thank you David. That was amazing!! So much to think about.
Scott Christensen
02:42:50
Thanks David!
Kristin Hall
02:42:56
Safe travels David! thank you
Kim Shelton
02:42:58
Miigwech!!!
Nicole Davros (she/her)
02:43:08
Thank you, David. Safe travels.
Steve Windels
02:43:09
Thanks, David!
Martha Minchak (she/her/hers/birdbrain)
02:43:55
Chi miigwech David! Safe travels and hope to see you again soon.
Liz Rasmussen
02:45:16
David mentioned an Ojibwe nighthawk story - For those interested, there is a book of Minnesota Ojibwe bird stories and legends "Binesi-Dibaajimowinan, Ojibwe Bird Stories," by Ogimaagiizhig Odoodeman Adikwan (Charles Grolla) that is fantastic. I reference it often as a biologist and birder.
Mark C Hove
02:45:59
Cool, thanks Liz!
Suzannah Tupy
02:46:19
I loved your humility and honesty, David. Miigwech for sharing your knowledge!
Martha Minchak (she/her/hers/birdbrain)
02:46:36
Thanks for the wonderful reference Liz! I haven't heard of that book before.
Suzannah Tupy
02:48:14
That sounds really interesting, Liz! I'm adding this to my reading list.
Mark C Hove
03:17:15
If you have a question, please type it in the Chat scroll, or, at the end of the presentation, use the raised hand symbol and share your question in the order at the top of the screen.
Mitch Springborn
03:20:02
Do you have a lot of problems with CWD in Yellowstone? And if so is there things you do to reduce the spread?
Mark Nelson
03:20:06
Scott - Thank you for your presentation. Can you say more about the process or tool you used for aggregating information to prioritize trout habitat work in the Madison?